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A Pullman Timeline

April, 30, 1997, Rev. December 7, 2002
Compiled by Frank H. Beberdick

1831    3 March, George Mortimer Pullman born Brocton, Chatauqua County, New York.

1856    The R.T. Woodruff Co. was formed. Silver Palace Cars were introduced in 1866. By 1870 Woodruff had 21     cars in operation and 8 additional cars were built for him by Barney & Smith in 1875.

1862    The Central Transportation Co. was formed as a consolidation between Woodruff and E.C. Knight. Central Transportation controlled the Eastern routes and most sleeping-car patents. They became the largest sleeping-car company in the country.

1862    The Indianapolis & St. Louis Sleeping Coach Co. was founded. This company operated sleeping cars between Terre Haute, IN and Columbus, OH. Pullman purchased the assets of the company in 1871.

1865    The Southern Transportation Co., a subsidiary of Central Transportation was formed to fill the demands for new markets in sleeping cars during the reconstruction of the railroads in the Southeast at the end of the Civil War.

1865    The Erie & Atlantic Sleeping Coach Co. was a joint stock association organized in New York State. In 1872 Pullman purchased two-thirds of the capital stock of this company. This transaction enabled Pullman to gain control of the sleeping-car service between Chicago and New York. In 1888 the Association was dissolved when Pullman acquired all of the stocks and assets of the company.

1866    Pullman, Kimball and Ramsey Sleeping Car Co. formed in Atlanta, GA on May 19. This was an effort by Pullman to counter the control of sleeping-car service in the South by Southern Transportation Co.

1866    Webster Wagner (1817-1882) formed the New York Central Sleeping Car Co. This company would see several presidents appointed by the Vanderbilt family including its last, a son-in-law, William Webb. The name was changed to the Wagner Palace Car Co. in 1886. During Webb's fifteen-year tenure he expanded the company's Buffalo shops and secured an experienced car builder, Thomas Bissell, superintendent of Barney & Smith and at one time head of Pullman's shops in Detroit.

1867    Pullman's Palace Car Co. formed in Illinois on 22 February. The company's initial offering of one million dollars in capital stock was quietly sold to railroad leaders and Chicago businessmen.

1867    On December 24th the Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. was incorporated.

1868    Pullman Palace Car Co. bought out Kimball and Ramsey and formed the Pullman Southern Palace Car Co. This company was merged with the parent company in the late 1890s that had always controlled it.

1868    The Pullman Pacific Car Co. was incorporated in the State of New York to provide sleeping-car service on the Union Pacific Railroad. Andrew Carnegie joined the newly-formed company as a major stockholder. Stock control was obtained by Pullman's Palace Car Co. on 15 November 1870.

1870    Pullman's Pacific Car Co. provided equipment for the first chartered Transcontinental excursion from Atlantic to Pacific sponsored by the Boston Board of Trade. The eight-car train traveled round-trip from Boston to San Francisco between May and June.

1870    Pullman signed a 99 year lease for control of the Central Transportation Co. At the same time the Southern Transportation Co. was leased by Pullman. Full acquisition of the Central Transportation Co. did not occur until 1899, two years after the death of George Pullman.

1870    The Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. purchased by Pullman Palace Car Co. This plant was located in Detroit on a large block at Crogham and Dequindre, intersected by the Detroit & Milwaukee Railroad tracks. One source indicates that the shops were located at Beaubien Street, and later they were moved to Monroe Avenue. The first Pullman-built cars came from these shops.
1870    In March the Crescent City Sleeping Car Co. was incorporated in the State of Kentucky. An amendment dated 13 February 1871 changed the name of the company to Pullman Southern Car Co. On 10 October     1872, Pullman, Kimball & Ramsey Sleeping Car Co. was acquired by Pullman Southern in exchange for capital stock. With the Southern Transportation Co. lease, Pullman now controlled the Southeast.

1871    During February the name of the Crescent City Sleeping Car Co. changed to Pullman Southern Car Co.

1871    On August 1st Pullman acquired the Indianapolis & St. Louis Sleeping Coach Co.

1871    In October an Association Agreement was signed with the Union Pacific and Pullman Pacific ceased operating, and was officially liquidated in 1884. The Central Pacific signed with Pullman in 1883, thus consolidating transcontinental sleeping-car service for the first time.

1871    The Woodruff Sleeping & Parlor Coach Co. was incorporated on 19 May in the State of Pennsylvania

1872    The company acquired shops at Elmira, NY from Erie & Atlantic Sleeping Car Co..

1872    Paine Lines, so-called, merged with Pullman Southern Car Co. on October 10th.

1872    Pullman Southern Car Co. was officially organized and began business with Pullman participating.

1872    Pullman Kimball and Ramsey Sleeping Car Co. officially merged with Pullman Southern Car Co.

1873    The property of the Detroit Car & Manufacturing Co. was purchased by Pullman and operated as the Detroit Shops of Pullman.

1873    Pullman entered the foreign market under an operating contract with the Midland Railway Co. of England. Six cars were built at the Detroit shops and shipped disassembled in 1874. This venture was unsuccessful as the demand for the cars was not great. The assets were sold to Pullman Company, Ltd. ("English Pullman") about 1906.

1873    Pullman acquired on January 31st the business of Detroit & Milwaukee Sleeping Car. Co.

1875    Parlor cars introduced into Pullman service.

1877    Pullman’s offer to purchase all the stock of Southern Transportation Co. was approved by directors and stockholders of that company.

1880    Pullman Land Association organized as a Massachusetts trust. During 1880-1882 capital stock issued (Net of 16,042 shares).

1880    Construction was started on the Chicago plant and the adjacent company town. The Pullman Palace Car Co. had acquired 3600 acres of land for the project. The first building to be completed was for the Allen Paper Car Wheel plant. The company town at the height of its development had about 12,000 inhabitants.

1880    Shops were established at Mantua, PA.

1881    The company established a shop in St. Louis.

1881    The Union Foundry and Pullman Car Wheel Works created by change of name on April 28th. Pullman acquired $150,000. of stock in Union Foundry and Pullman Car Wheel Works on May 2nd.
1883    The main office for Pullman was built in Chicago at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Adams Street.

1883    The Mann Boudoir Car Co. was chartered in the state New York on March 23rd. The company operated at a loss for the five years of its existence.

1883    G.M. Pullman and his associates founded and began operation of the Pullman Loan & Savings Bank. Pullman’s Palace Car Co. put up $62,000. of the $100,000. capitalization.

1884    The Mantua, PA shops were abandoned.

1884    On May 1st Pullman Pacific Car Co. ceased operations.

1884    Pullman started operations in Mexico; providing service between El Paso and Mexico City. This was a successful operation, lasting, except during the Mexican Revolution between 1914 and 1920. It continued until the Pullman Co. was dissolved.

1886    The shops at Elmira, NY were abandoned and a new shop at Wilmington, DE was established.

1886    Pullman purchased the plant of Dure Car Manufacturing Co., formerly Bowers, Dure & Co., Wilmington, Delaware.

1886    The Union Foundry adjacent to the Chicago Pullman Works was bought by the company.

1888    The Union Palace Car Co. was incorporated 24 September in New Jersey to secure control of the Woodruff and Mann companies through an exchange of common stock. Mann had a shop in Ludlow, KY.

1888    G.M. Pullman sold 2200 shares of Allen Paper Car Wheel Co. to Pullman’s Palace Car Co.

1888    Sherwin-Williams purchased a controlling interest in the Calumet Paint Co. in Chicago from Pullman.

1889    The Union Palace Co. was absorbed by Pullman.

1891    The St. Louis repair shops were destroyed by fire and rebuilt in 1899.

1892    Fire destroyed the first market hall in Pullman community on April 7th. Structure was soon built

1893    Detroit shops abandoned because of the nationwide recession.

1894    Assets of the Union Foundry and Pullman Car Wheel works were sold to Pullman and the bill of sale was executed October 1st. On October 4th Union Foundry and Pullman Car Wheel Works were dissolved.

1894    On May 11th a strike was called by the American Railway Union headed by Eugene Debs. On August 2nd the strike collapsed with the ARU officers in jail. The plant reopens.

1894    Pullman Southern Car Co. dissolution approved by Directors of the Company.

1896    On July 31 Pullman’s Palace Car Co. acquired the outstanding shares of Pullman Land Association for cash or in exchange for its own stock.

1896    By July 31st Pullman’s Palace Car Co. had acquired the 16,042 outstanding shares of Pullman Land Association for cash or in exchange of its own stock. Until May 31, 1924, Pullman Land Association was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman’s Palace Car Co. and its successor, The Pullman Co.

1897    G.M. Pullman died and Robert T. Lincoln, the son Abraham Lincoln, assumed presidency of the company. When Pullman died he left behind an estate of $7.6 million, 2490 railroad cars, and a $63.5 million corporation.

1899    Pullman purchased the property of Pullman Iron & Steel Co. on May 10th.

1900    The Pullman Palace Car Co. bought its major competitor, the Wagner Palace Car Co. of Buffalo, NY on 1 January. The area of the plant located at Broadway and Bailey covered 35.7 acres.

1900    Corporate name changed to The Pullman Company.

1900    The Allen Paper Car Wheel Works, adjacent to the main factory, was bought by the Pullman Company.

1900    On 1 September the Calumet Shops at Chicago were opened as a repair shop. James Wares became their first manager and remained in that capacity until his retirement in 1918. These shops had previously been used for street car production.

1901    The Wilmington, DE repair shops were completely rebuilt.

1902    The Standard Steel Car Co. was incorporated on 2 January with a capital stock of $3 million. The plant was located at Butler, PA. This company was formed by J.M. Hansen and James B. "Diamond Jim" Brady.

1902    Detroit Shops sold to Detroit United Railway.

1906    On August 25th Pullman Railroad Co. was incorporated in Illinois as a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Pullman’s Palace Car Co., the predecessor of the Pullman Co.

1906    The Standard Steel Car Co. built a plant at Hammond, IN. The plant was designed to produce both passenger and freight cars. During WWI this facility turned out military railway cars, shell forgings and 240 mm Howitzer carriages. Among other products turned out during WWII were M-3 and M-4 tanks. The army combat tank program was to produce 3928 units between November 1941 and August 1945.

1907    In March the first modern steel car, the Jamestown was built at a cost of $30,000, to serve as the Pullman     Company's exhibit at the Jamestown Exposition at Norfolk, VA.

1907    The Pullman Co. by court order was required to sell the company town and all property it did not need for car construction.

1907    The south wing of the erecting shop in Chicago at Cottage Grove and 111th Street was rebuilt to larger dimensions to accommodate steel car construction.

1907    Pullman Loan & Savings Bank name changed to The Pullman Trust & Savings Bank.

1909    Land acquired in Richmond, CA for establishing shops.

1909    A small shop located on leased ground at Ludlow, KY, near Cincinnati was opened in December.

1909    The assets of Mann's Boudoir Car Co. and the Union Palace Car Co. sold to Pullman Co. on 31 October.

1909    On October 31st the assets of Woodruff Sleeping and Parlor Coach Co. sold to Pullman.

1910    The company secured 133 acres on the north side of 103rd Street in Chicago, immediately north of the passenger site and erected a building for freight car construction.

1911    Robert T. Lincoln resigned the presidency of the company and John S. Runnells was the named the new president.

1911    A site of 21 acres was acquired at Richmond, CA for plant construction. This plant replaced the one located in Denver which was soon closed after the California plant was completed.

1912    The last major acquisition of outside rolling stock took place on 31 December when the company purchased 252 wooden cars from the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. Pullman viewed this purchase as the elimination of another competitor. Restrictions were put on the use of wooden cars in the tunnels approaching the new Grand Central Station and the NYNH &H could not afford to replace these cars

1915    George Pullman left in his will the sum of $1.2 million for the establishment of a school for children of the company's employees. This resulted in the construction of the Pullman School of Manual Training. The school opened this year on 111th Street several blocks west of the shops and company town.

1918    Construction on new repair shops started at St. Louis. Large additions were started on the existing Buffalo plant.

1920    From July of this year through 1922 the company produced approximately 13,000 steel automobile bodies for the Packard Motor Car Co. These bodies were produced in a plant constructed in 1919 in the north part of the manufacturing area at Maryland Avenue and 103rd Street. During 1919, 50,000 phonograph cabinets were produced in this plant for the Edison Phonograph Works. This building was converted to an apartment complex during the 1970s.

1922    Edward F. Carey replaced John Runnells as president and was to remain in this position until 1929. During this year Carey negotiated a merger with the freight car builder, Haskell & Barker Co. of Michigan City, IN. John Runnells became chairman of the board at this time.

1923    First modern lightweight car built for the Illinois Central suburban service in Chicago.

1924    On May 31st the stock of the Pullman Land Association was transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) in exchange for stock.

1924    On May 31st the stock of the Pullman Railroad Co. was transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Co. (Illinois) in exchange for stock.

1924    The Pullman Co. transferred all its shares of Pullman Railroad Co. to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) in exchange for a portion of its originally issued stock.

1924    The Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. was incorporated in Illinois on June 18th to consolidate its car building interests.

1924    All of the capital stock of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) was issued to The Pullman Co. on June 19th in exchange for the net assets of the manufacturing department of The Pullman Co. The transfer was effective as of May 31, 1924 and included all of the shares of Harbor City Land Co. Harbor City Land Co. was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Haskell & Barker Car Co. of Indiana.

1927    Pullman Safe Deposit Co. was incorporated as a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Pullman Trust and Savings Bank on March 4th (250 shares of capital stock - $100. par value).

1927    On April 1st Dickson Car Wheel Co. was acquired by Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois).

1927    June 21 Pullman, Inc. was incorporated in Delaware.

1927    New Orleans Car Wheel Co., Inc. was incorporated in Louisiana as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. on June 25th.

1927    The directors of the Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) approved on July 8th the purchase of the entire capital stock of New Orleans Car Wheel Co., Inc. This subsidiary was incorporated to operate a car wheel foundry constructed pursuant to directors’ resolution of January 11, 1927.

1927    Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) paid on July 11th all of the shares of Pullman Land Association as a dividend to The Pullman Co.

1927    Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) paid all of the shares of Pullman Railroad Co. as a dividend to The Pullman Co. on July 11th.

1927    July 27th Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) purchased all of the shares of Pullman Railroad Co. from the Pullman Co. for the same amount at which these shares were distributed as a dividend on July 11, 1927

1927    The Pullman Co. on July12th transferred all the outstanding stock of Pullman Car &Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) to Pullman Inc. in exchange for stock of Pullman Inc. This exchange was made in connection with the reorganization of The Pullman Co., Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) and the organization of Pullman Inc. The Pullman Co. also received Pullman Inc. stock in exchange for its own stock, and thereupon, became a subsidiary of Pullman Inc. The Pullman Co. became a 99.62 percent owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. as of March 20, 1928. This reorganization was effected by Pullman Inc. acquiring all of the outstanding shares (500,000) of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) from The Pullman Co. on July12, 1927, in exchange for 675,000 shares of Pullman Inc. stock. By December 31, 1929, 1,349,232 shares had been acquired.

1927    On July 27th Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) purchased all of the shares of Pullman Land Association from the Pullman Co. for the same amount at which these shares were distributed on July 11, 1927. Until December 22, 1947, Pullman Land Association was a subsidiary of Pullman Car Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) and its successors, Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) and its successors, Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) and Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Corp.

1928    C.A. Liddle appointed president of Pullman Car and Manufacturing Corp. He remained in this position     until 1935.

1929    Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. of Alabama was incorporated on January 15th in Alabama with an authorized capital of 20 shares and became a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. The business was operated by Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) under a lease agreement.

1929    During this year a subsidiary of the Tennessee Coal & Iron Railroad Co. of Alabama, the Chicksaw Shipbuilding and Car Co., was purchased by Pullman-Standard. Some of the buildings and equipment were moved to Bessemer, AL. Here they formed part of the sixteen-building plant for the production of various types of freight cars. During WWII bomb casings were added to their product mix.

1929    John Runnells resigned as chairman of the board and David A. Crawford assumed his responsibilities. Crawford was to remain chairman until 1947.

1930    On February 18th Osgood Bradley Car Co. (Massachusetts) and Pullman Inc. entered into a purchase agreement
1930    Osgood Bradley Car Corp. was incorporated on February 20th in Delaware. Stock ownership was assigned by Pullman Inc. to Standard Steel Car Corp. (Pennsylvania). The Osgood Bradley plant was the single Pullman plant that was equipped for mass production of electrically operated streetcars and trolley coaches. The first passenger car built for steam roads came out of Bradley’s shop in 1833.

1930    Standard Steel Car Corp. was incorporated on February 24th in Pennsylvania as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. This corporation was created as part of the Standard Steel Car Co. (Pennsylvania) and Osgood Bradley Car Co. (Massachusetts) take over agreement. The agreement permitted use of the name: Osgood Bradley Car Corp. (Delaware).

1930    On March 1st Pullman Inc. acquired the properties of the Standard Steel Car Co. (Pennsylvania) and subsidiaries and Osgood Bradley Car Co. (Massachusetts) in exchange for Pullman Inc. stock and cash. Included among the properties acquired was the Middletown Car Co. During 1907 the first freight cars from the Standard Steel Car Co. were completed at the Hammond shop. During 1909 the first passenger cars were completed in Hammond.

1931    Standard Steel Car Corp. (Pennsylvania) declared a special dividend on February 18th of all the outstanding stock of Middletown Car Co. to Pullman Inc.

1931    The name of Middletown Car Co. was changed on March 5th to Pullman Standard Car Export Corp.

1931    The Pullman ice-cooled air-conditioned cars placed in service. Also placed in service was the double deck bed-room car.

1931    Middletown Car Co. (Proprietary) Limited name changed to Pullman-Standard Car Corp. (Proprietary) Limited.

1931    Standard Steel Car Corp. of Delaware was incorporated in Delaware on December 15th. All of the stock was issued to Pullman Inc. in exchange for all of the outstanding capital stock of Standard Steel Car Corp. (Pennsylvania).

1931    On December 23rd Dickson Car Wheel Co. became a subsidiary of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware), when Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) transferred all of its assets to the Delaware corporation.

1931    Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) was reincorporated in Delaware on December 31st. Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) transferred all of its stock to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) in exchange for the net assets of that company. Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) distributed the stock of the new Delaware corporation to Pullman Inc. Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) was then dissolved.

1932    On January 2nd the stock of the Pullman Railroad Co. was transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) when Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) was reincorporated in Delaware.

1932    Pullman Trust & Savings Bank was organized in Illinois with an authorized capital of 2900 shares ($100 par value). Under the April 30, 1932 agreement it took over the assets and assumed the liabilities of The Pullman Trust & Savings Bank for liquidation.

1931    The Pullman Co. built its last standard sleeping car in February.

1933    Osgood Bradley Car Corp. (Delaware) name changed on June 27th to Pullman-Bradley Car Corp.

1933    Pullman-Standard Car Corp. (Proprietary) Limited allowed to lapse and presumably was formally dissolved under South African law for failure to file the desired reports.
1933    America's first all-aluminum sleeping car, the George M. Pullman is placed on exhibition at A Century of Progress in Chicago.

1934    On December 26th Standard Steel Car Corp. of Delaware was a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. Standard Steel Car Corp. of Delaware had as wholly-owned subsidiaries: Pullman-Bradley Car Corp., Richmond Car Corp., Lyndora Land & Improvement Co. and Standard Steel Car Corp. (Pennsylvania).
On this date, Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) participated in a statutory merger with Standard Steel Car Corp. of Delaware, Pullman-Bradley Car Corp. and Richmond Car Corp. The assets of these companies were transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware). Lyndora Land & Improvement Co. and Standard Steel Car Corp. (Pennsylvania) were simultaneously liquidated and their assets transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware). Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) issue stock to Pullman Inc. in exchange for the assets received from Standard Steel Corp. of Delaware and its subsidiaries. Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) continued in existence as Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1934    Dickson Car Wheel Co and New Orleans Car Wheel Co., Inc., wholly-owned subsidiaries of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware), were also liquidated on December 26, 1934, and their assets transferred to Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware).

1934    New Orleans Car Wheel Co. was dissolved on December 31st.

1934    During April Pullman Inc. purchased the assets of Canton Repair Car Co. for cash.

1935    The Certificate of Dissolution of Dickson Car Wheel Co. became effective on March 1st.

1935    C.A. Liddle appointed president of Pullman-Standard Car and Mfgr. Co. He was to remain in this position     until 1946.

1939    Pullman-Standard constructed a new building on Cottage Grove Avenue just north of 111th Street for their     engineering department.

1939    Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co., in an exchange of deeds with the American Brake Shoe & Foundry Co., received the Hammond Wheel Foundry in exchange for Pullman’s Huston, Texas wheel foundry.

1940    The Edward G. Budd Manufacturing Co. of Philadelphia filed a complaint in Federal District Court against the Pullman Co. for unfair competition by monopoly. The litigation ended in 1944 when Pullman was ordered to sell either its operating or manufacturing companies.

1943    The 103rd Street plant at Chicago, was converted by the Defense Plant Corp. to manufacture aircraft wings for U.S. Army Air Corps C47 and C54 transport planes.

1943    Pullman-Standard started production in a shipyard on Lake Calumet in Chicago of a series of 34 patrol craft (PCEs) for the U.S. Navy and the British government. The US Navy ordered 44 medium landing ships (LSMs) from the shipyard. The first PCE was launched on 5 May 1943 and the first LSM was launched on 29 April 1944. Subassembly of the boat sections was done at the 111th Street Shops. The last LSM was launched on 31 March 1945. Pullman-Standard was the “lead yard” for the construction of certain naval vessels around the country.

1943    The inactive Pullman-Standard Car Export Corp. plant in Middletown, PA sold to the U.S. Government for $70,000.

1943    The first 1200 troop sleepers rolled off the assembly line at the Michigan City plant in September of this year. The last troop sleeper was shipped during March of 1944.
1944    (August 5) On 3-1-1930, Pullman Inc. acquired the properties of Standard Steel Car Co. (Pennsylvania) which included Middletown Car Company’s plant at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. On 8-5-1944, this plant was sold to Fabrica Nacional de Vagoes S/A (a corporation of Brazil) for $500,000.

1944    The M.W. Kellogg Co. of New Jersey, a leading engineering and construction firm specializing in oil refining and chemical processing, acquired as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. on December 21st.

1945    On December 31st Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. – successor to Pullman’s Palace Car Co., The Pullman Co., Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Illinois) and Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. (Delaware) sold its investment in Pullman Trust & Savings Bank to the Morris Plan Corp. and to officers and individuals of the bank.

1946    Champ Carry replaces C.A. Liddle as president of Pullman-Standard and served until 1950. C.A. Liddle becomes chairman of the board of Pullman-Standard.

1946    (November) The 3-1-1930 Pullman Inc. acquisition of Standard Steel Car Co. (Pennsylvania) included stock owned by Middletown Car Co. in Entreprises Industrielles Charentaises of La Rochelle, France. On 11-25-1941 a Pullman-Standard Car Export Corp. (formally Middletown Car Co.) resolution gave authority to negotiate for the sale of this stock in E.I.C. Due to the declaration of war in December 1941, negotiations which were then pending were abandoned. During the war the German occupation of France the stock was sequestered by the German authorities. Upon the resumption of control by the French authorities, the German interests were taken over by the French Government. In November 1946, Pullman-Standard Car Export Corp. sold the stock to Compania Arena Limitada (a corporation with its principal office in Zurich for $150,000.

1947    Subsequent to the 1934 merger and liquidations, the principal subsidiaries of Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. were Pullman Land Association, Pullman Railroad Co. and Harbor City Land Co. The Harbor City Land Co. was liquidated on February 28, 1947 and its net assets were transferred to Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1947    Pullman Inc. by federal court order, sold on June 30th The Pullman Co., the sleeping car division, to 59 railroads. The capitol stock of the company was now owned by these railroads. There was no further connection or affiliation with Pullman Incorporated or the Pullman-Standard Manufacturing Co. Sale price to the railroads was $40 million. See 1940 entry above.

1947    On August 1st Pullman Finance and Properties Co. was incorporated in Delaware as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc.

1947    During this year Pullman Inc. purchased the Power Ballaster Co. of Hammond, IN. Power Ballaster manufactured railroad track maintenance equipment.

1947    Pullman Standard introduced the PS-1 standardized box car. By 1963 over 100,000 of this design had been sold to various customers.

1947    December 22nd the stock of Pullman Railroad Co. and Pullman land Association was paid as a dividend to Pullman Inc. by Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1947    Pullman Inc. exchanged the shares of Pullman Railroad Co. and Pullman Land Association, together with cash, for 10,000 shares of Pullman Finance and Properties on December 31st.

1948    On December 31st Pullman Incorporated’s investment in Pullman-Standard Car Export Corp. was donated to Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1949    The Pullman School of Manual Training located on East 111th St. closed.

1949    Pullman Finance and Properties Co. sold all of the stock of Pullman Railroad Co. to the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad Co. for cash.

1950    Champ Carry appointed president of Pullman, Inc.

1950    C.W. Bryan, Jr. was president of Pullman-Standard until ______________________ .

1950    On December 14th Isaacson Iron Works (a Washington Corporation) sold certain property and assets to Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co., which included a plant at Rockford, IL. (They manufactured tractor equipment and heavy forgings).

1951    On June 14th Trailmobile, Inc. a Delaware corporation, was incorporated as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc.

1951    Pullman Inc. formed Trailmobile Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary, which acquired on June 30th. substantially all of the assets of The Trailmobile Co. of Cincinnati, a leading producer of highway trailers.

1951     The world’s first full-length dome car was produced for the Milwaukee Road.

1951    The United Steel Workers of America called a company-wide strike. After six weeks a settlement was negotiated in Washington, D.C. with Arthur Goldberg, who was then General Counsel for the union.

1951    Pullman Inc. exchanged 20 shares of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. of Alabama for 20 shares of capital stock of Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. on September 28th (Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. of Alabama, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. was merged with Pullman Standard Car Manufacturing Co. pursuant to an agreement dated September 19, 1951. By the terms of the agreement, Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. continued as the surviving corporation. The entire capital stock of Pullman Car & Manufacturing Corp. of Alabama was converted to shares of Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1952    W. Irving Osborne named a director of Pullman, Inc.

1953    (December 28) Pullman land Association sold all of its land to Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co.

1953    (December 29) The Board of Directors of approved a plan of complete liquidation and dissolution of Pullman Land Association.

1953    (December 31) Pullman Land Association paid a liquidation distribution to Pullman Finance and Properties Co.

1954    (May 1) The certificate of final dissolution of Pullman Land Association was completed.

1954    Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. sold, on May 24th, its tractor spare parts business to Allied Tractor Equipment Co.

1954    The former Allen Paper Car Wheel plant building on Cottage Grove Avenue was demolished in November. This was George Pullman's first building at the Pullman Car Works. Prior to demolition the building served as a shipping and receiving dock.

1955    On January 10th Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing sold its Rockford plant to Goss Printing Press Co.

1955    On August 5th Trailmobile Finance was incorporated in Delaware as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc.

1956    The last Pullman Standard lightweight sleeping cars (Lot 6959) were delivered to the Union Pacific Railroad in April.

1956    Pullman main office at Michigan Ave. and Adams St. in Chicago was demolished.

1957    From 22 to 25 March the General Offices were moved from the Merchandise Mart to the 13th and 14th floors of the Canal-Randolph Building at 165 North Canal Street, Chicago.

1958    Pullman-Standard closed down the plant on Cottage Grove Avenue and 111th Street in Chicago and moved all operations to Building 100, located a short distance to the east, near the Calumet Expressway.

1959     On July 1st Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. transferred Pullman-Standard Car Export Corp. stock to Pullman Inc.

1959    On July 1st Pullman-Standard Car Manufacturing Co. and Pullman Finance and Properties Co. were merged into Pullman Inc. Pullman Finance and Properties Co. ceased to exist and Pullman-Standard is to operate as a division of Pullman Inc.

1959    The Pullman plant in Buffalo, NY was shut down. Some of the Buffalo employees of this facility transferred to the Calumet shops in Chicago.

1959    Transport Leasing Co. was incorporated in Delaware on August 13th as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc.

1959    Swindell-Dressler Corp., a major designer of industrial plants, and builder of furnaces and kilns for the metallurgical and ceramic industries, acquired on September 23rd as a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pullman Inc. via an exchange of stock arrangement. By 1970, Swindell-Dressler was called Pullman Swindell

1960    All of the shares of The Canadian Kellogg Co., Ltd. were transferred to Pullman Inc. on May 20th by the M.W. Kellogg Co. Directors each hold one qualifying share. Each has signed a stock power in blank, a Declaration of Trust and a dividend distribution direction in favor of Pullman Inc.

1960    In June of this year the company closed the Worcester, MA plant.

1961    The foundry at the Hammond, IN plant was closed.

1961    W. Irving Osborne, Jr. named president of Pullman, Inc.
1961    On December 29 the trustees of the Harriet Pullman Schermerhorn Trust gave the University of Chicago $500,000 to endow a chair in English Composition.

1962    Unimation, Inc. organized as a Pullman Inc. subsidiary to develop, manufacture and market an industrial robot.

1965    Standard Steel Works, Inc. a manufacturer of tank trailers, acquired as a Pullman Inc. subsidiary.

1966    Champ Carry resigns as president of Pullman, Inc. on 30 June.

1966    W. Irving Osborne, Jr. became chairman of the Pullman board.

1966    Construction started on a new research center at the Hammond plant during November. At its dedication on 20 June 1967 it became the Champ Carry Technical Center.

1969    On January 1st all operations by the Pullman Co. of sleeping cars for the various railroads ceased. This was stated by G.W. Bohannon, president of Pullman Co. See 1947 entry above.

1970    The Chicago Calumet shops were closed.

1970    On December 20 Pullman Corp. announced that the Michigan, IN freight car plant was closed

1971    The community of Pullman is declared a local, state and national landmark.

1972    The company won an order from the New York Transit System for 754 cars, the largest order ever placed for such equipment with a single manufacturer.

1974    W. Irving Osborne, Jr. retired as chairman of the Pullman board.

1975    On 4 April of this year James A. McDivitt was elected Vice President of Pullman Inc. He was to have corporate responsibility for the Pullman-Standard Division. He later became president of the Pullman-Standard Division.

1979    Since the start of the Bessemer operation approximately 260,00 freight car units have been shipped. This includes box, hopper, gondola and flat cars.

1980    Silas Keehn selected chairman of the board of Pullman, Inc.

1981    Pullman was incorporated in Delaware as a wholly owned subsidiary of Wheelabrator-Frye, Inc. to serve as a holding company in the transportation industry. Pullman Swindell was teamed with The Rust Engineering Company, the sixth largest engineering firm in the USA.

1981    This year saw the outshopping of an Amtrak bi-level car, the George M. Pullman. In 2000 this car was still operating between Chicago and the west coast.

1982    The Pullman-Standard plant, located in Building 100, in Chicago was closed.

1983    Pullman Transportation Co. Inc. sold virtually all of its rail-car manufacturing assets to Trinity Industries Inc. Pullman Transportation also acquired two transportation-related businesses from Signal Cos. Inc. – Trailmobile Inc. and Aerospace Division – for $28 million.

1984    Pullman sold its freight car plants in Butler, PA and Bessemer, AL to Dallas-based Trinity Industries, Inc.    

1985    On October 25, Pullman acquired Peabody International Corp.

1987    Joseph T. Ryerson, Inc. purchased the eastern section of the Pullman-Standard plant in Chicago. This portion of the Pullman plant Building No. 100) is bounded roughly, by 105th Street on the north, the Calumet Expressway on the east, 111th Street on the south and industrial railroad tracks of the old Pullman Railroad on the west.

1987    Pullman Co. of Princeton, NJ agrees to buy Clevite of Glenville, IL. Pullman's chairman and CEO, Thomas M. Begel, stated that he wanted to build Pullman's assets and earnings through the acquisition of industrial manufacturing businesses. Pullman, formerly known as Pullman-Peabody Co. has been shopping for an acquisition since being rebuffed by Joy Manufacturing Co. last year. The Wall Street Journal, 26 May.

1988    Forstmann Little & Co. reached a definitive merger agreement under which Pullman would receive $650 million. Under the deal, the FLPC Acquisition Corp., a company formed by Forstmann Little for the acquisition, would pay $9.25 in cash per share for Pullman's 41.9 million shares, or about $387.57 million. Forstmann will also assume debt and expenses giving the deal a value of $650 million. Chicago Tribune,     1 August.

1994    The former paint shop of Pullman in Danville, IL was acquired by JAIX Leasing Co. This is being converted into a car-rebuilding shop. Chicago Tribune, 7 September.

1994    Pullman sold its freight car plants in Bessemer, AL and Butler, PA to Dallas-based Trinity, Industries, Inc.

1995    Wm. T. Ylvisaker was named chairman of American Passenger Rail Car Co. or Amerail which was spun off as an independent company by the ailing Morrison Knudsen Corp. The new company's headquarters are located in the old Pullman Standard building at 900 E. 103rd St. in Chicago. Chicago Tribune, 18 October.

1996    Tenneco of Greenwich, CT completed buyout of Pullman Co. for $300 million in a move that increases Tenneco's stake in the auto parts industry. Pullman's main business is Clevite, which makes auto and truck suspension systems. Chicago Tribune, 2 July.

1998    In December the 1880 Administration Building/Erection Shops located at Cottage Grove Avenue and 111th Street in Chicago were seriously damaged by fire. A task force headed by former governor of Illinois James Thompson was formed to investigate the possibility of rebuilding these historic buildings.

2002    On November 1st of this year W. Irving Osborne, Jr. former chairman of the Pullman board died in his Lake Forest, IL home. Chicago Tribune, November 4, 2002.

More Information About the Pullman Company

The Water Tower

Images of the The Water Tower

Left to right, The Allen Paper Wheelworks, The Water Tower, and the Corliss Engine House.

The Pullman Building

Images of the The Pullman Building

A postcard image of the Pullman Building.

Music Inspired by Pullman


Pullman Porter Man
Behim, Arthur E.
New York : J.H. Remick & Co., c1911.

Edison Films of Pullman Travel


From A Romance of the Rail, 1903

The Pullman State Historic Site

11111 S. Forrestville Avenue
Chicago, IL 60628
773.660.2341

http://www.pullman-museum.org/
sleepingcars at sbcglobal.net

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